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So you just finished building an awesome new website on Drupal, but now you’ve run into a new dilemma. How do optimize the site for search engines? Search engine optimization, or SEO, can be overwhelming, but don’t let that cause you to ignore certain things you can do to help drive traffic to your website. There’s nothing worse than spending countless hours to develop a web application, only to find out that users aren’t able to find your site. This can be extremely frustrating, as well as devastating if your company or business heavily relies on organic traffic.

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Gsoc17 : Client Side File crypto : Week 11

This blog post summarizes the eleventh week of writing open-source code for Drupal with Google Summer of Code.

The module is finally complete with most of it’s major features. It is complete for testing and a bit more changes are to be made that have been discussed, suggested and some things that were planned and are left to implement.

tameeshb Wed, 08/16/2017 - 03:46 Tags GSoC Google Summer of Code 2017 Drupal Drupal Blog

Migrating your site to Drupal 8 isn't simple or cheap. Nor is maintaining it or getting support once your new Drupal 8 site is live!

This is a problem that affects all organizations using Drupal, but it's particularly hard on smaller nonprofits.

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a super long article detailing how Drupal 8 has left many small nonprofits behind. It also proposes a possible path for fixing it!

We're building an Open Source platform for nonprofit websites built on Drupal 8 and CiviCRM, available as a SaaS with hosting and support included.

That article was primarily about why - in this article I'd like to talk about the details of how!

There's a lot to discuss, but I'll try to make this article shorter. :-)

Oh, and we're looking for 10 adventurous nonprofits to join the BETA and help build it.

If you join the BETA, we'll migrate your existing site to the new Drupal 8 & CiviCRM platform for FREE!

Read more to learn about all the details we've got worked out so far...

Call for help with Media source plugin porting slashrsm Wed, 16.08.2017 - 10:42

As you may already know Media entity module entered Drupal 8.4 as Media module earlier this year. This was the result of years of hard work in contrib and core space. While the module stayed conceptually the same we used this opportunity to clean it up and refactor some things; mostly to make APIs even easier to understand and use.

Media entity comes with the concept of so-called source plugins (also called type plugins in the past). They are responsible for everything related to a specific media type: they have knowledge about their nature, about the way they should be stored and displayed, they are aware of any business logic related to them, etc.

There were many plugins already available before Drupal core decided to adopt the module and they mostly lived as separate modules in contrib space. Since the API changed a bit during the core transition all this plugins need to be updated. The process is pretty straightforward, but the number of modules that need to be worked on is quite high. This means that we'll need quite some help from the community to do this as fast and as effectively as possible.

Here is where you come in!

Are you interested in contributing but don't know how? Are you looking for a task that is relatively simple but not completely trivial? Then the porting of media source plugins might be a really good entry point for you!

There is a meta issue that is trying to keep the overview over the porting process. You will find the list of modules and their current status in it. In order to get familiar with the changes that were introduced during the core transition you should check the relevant change record. All information that is needed for ports should be available there. If you'd rather work with examples then take a look at Media entity image and Media entity document, which were adopted to core as Image and File source plugins respectively.

When you decided which module deserves your attention check its issue queue. If there is already an issue about the porting get involved there. If there is not create one to let others know that you are working on the port. In any case make sure to add its reference to the meta overview issue. This will help us to keep the general overview over the process.

Need help?

Have you checked all the resources I mentioned above and you feel that there are still things that are not entirely clear? Come to the #drupal-media channel on IRC. We are hanging out in that channel most of the times. Our weekly meetings happen in the same channel every Wednesday at 14h UTC.

Enjoyed this post? There is more! Results of the Drupal 8 media sprint Call for Drupal 8 media ecosystem co-maintainers Presentations about various Drupal 8 media modules

What makes any web development team strong? Right, it's people who are the most important part of the success. So, how to shape a great team member out of a newbie?

Here is a small note on how an integration process is set in our Drupal team. We will guide you through all the stages: from an interview to team-building events.

 

Check out if you included all essential adaptation steps into your workflow.

 

 

 

Extending GraphQL: Part 1 - Fields

The last blog post might have left you wondering: "Plugins? It already does everything!". Or you are like one of the busy contributors and already identified a missing feature and can't wait to take the matter into your own hands (good choice).

In this and the following posts we will walk you through the extension capabilities of the GraphQL Core module and use some simple examples to show you how to solve common use cases.

Philipp Melab Wed, 08/16/2017 - 12:36

I will assume that you are already familiar with developing Drupal modules and have some basic knowledge of the Plugin API and Plugin Annotations.

The first thing you will want to do is disabling GraphQL schema and result caches. Add these parameters to your development.services.yml:

parameters: graphql.config: result_cache: false schema_cache: false

This will make sure you don't have to clear caches with every change.

As a starting point, we create an empty module called graphql_example. In the GitHub repository for this tutorial, you will find the end result as well as commits for every major step.

Diff: The module boilerplate

A simple page title field

Can't be too hard, right? We just want to be able to ask the GraphQL API what our page title is.
To do that we create a new class PageTitle in the appropriate plugin namespace Drupal\graphql_example\Plugin\GraphQL\Fields.

Let's talk this through. We've created a new derivation of FieldPluginBase, the abstract base class provided by the graphql_core module.

It already does the heavy lifting for integrating our field into the schema. It does this based on the meta information we put into the annotation:

  • id: A unique id for this plugin.
  • type: The return type GraphQL will expect.
  • name: The name we will use to invoke the field.
  • nullable: Defines if the field can return null values or not.
  • multi: Defines if the field will return a list of values.

Now, all we need to do is implement resolveValues to actually return a field value. Note that this method expects you to use the yield keyword instead of return and therefore return a generator.

Fields also can return multiple values, but the framework already handles this within GraphQL type definitions. So all we do is yield as many values as we want. For single value fields, the first one will be chosen.

So we run the first GraphQL query against our custom field.

query { pageTitle }

And the result is disappointing.

{ "data": { "pageTitle": null } }

Diff: The naive approach

The page title is always null because we extract the page title of the current page, which is the GraphQL API callback and has no title. We then need a way to tell it which page we are talking about.

Adding a path argument

Lucky us, GraphQL fields also can accept arguments. We can use them to pass the path of a page and get the title for real. To do that, we add a new annotation property called arguments. This is a map of argument names to the argument type. In our case, we added one argument with name path that expects a String value.

Any arguments will be passed into our resolveValues method with the $args parameter. So we can use the value there to ask the Drupal route matcher to resolve the route and create the proper title for this path.

Let's try again.

query { pageTitle(path: "/admin") }

Way better:

{ "data": { "pageTitle": "Administration" } }

Congratulations, MVP satisfied - you can go home now!

Diff: Using arguments

If there wasn't this itch every developer has when the engineering senses start to tingle. Last time we stumbled on this ominous route field that also takes a path argument. And this ...

query { pageTitle(path: "/node/1") route(path: "/node/1") { ... } }

... smells like a low hanging fruit. There has to be a way to make the two of them work together.

Attaching fields to types

Every GraphQL field can be attached to one or more types by adding the types property to its annotation. In fact, if the property is omitted, it will default to the Root type which is the root query type and the reason our field appeared there in the first place.

We learned that the route field returns a value of type Url. So we remove the argument definition and add a types property instead.

This means the $args parameter won't receive the path value anymore. Instead, the $value parameter will be populated with the result of the route field. And this is a Drupal Url object that we already can be sure is routed since route won't return it otherwise. With this in mind, we can make the solution even simpler.

Now we have to adapt our query since our field is nested within another.

query { route(path: "/admin") { pageTitle } }

Which also will return a nested result.

{ "data": { "route": { "pageTitle": "Administration" } } }

The price of a more complex nested result might seem high for not having to pass the same argument twice. But there's more to what we just did. By attaching the pageTitle field to the Url type, we added it wherever the type appears. Apart from the route field this also includes link fields, menu items or breadcrumbs. And potentially every future field that will return objects of type Url.
We just turned our simple example into the Swiss Army Knife (pun intended) of page title querying.

Diff: Contextual fields

I know what you are thinking. Even an achievement of this epic scale is worthless without test coverage. And you are right. Let's add some.

Adding tests

Fortunately the GraphQL module already comes with an easy to use test base class that helps us to safeguard our achievement in no time.

First, create a tests directory in the module folder. Inside that, a directory called queries that contains one file - page_title.gql - with our test query. A lot of editors already support GraphQL files with syntax highlighting and autocompletion, that's why we moved the query payload to another file.

The test itself just has to extend GraphQLFileTestBase, add the graphql_example module to the list of modules to enable and execute the query file.

Diff: Adding a test

Wrap-Up

We just created a simple field, passed arguments to it, learned how to attach it to an already existing type and finally verified our work by adding a test case. Not bad for one day's work. Next time we will have a look at Types and Interfaces, and how to use them to create fields with complex results.

If you’ve ever used Alexa, it may seem like it must be extremely complicated to get her to respond like she does. However, if you have your content inside Drupal, it’s not terribly difficult to get her to utilize that data for your own custom Alexa skill. Let’s take a look at how to accomplish that.
 

Modal dialogs are incredibly useful on websites as they allow the user to do something without having to leave the web page they are on. Drupal 8 now has a Dialog API in core, which greatly reduces the amount of code you need to write to create a modal dialog. Dialogs in Drupal 8 leverage jQuery UI.

In the second part of this series on modal dialogs in Drupal 8, we are going to go a step further from last week by creating the modal in a custom module.

Pushing clean codes is not every one cups of tea, it needs extensive knowledge and practice. Before a website go live, it needs to pass certain standards and checks in order to deliver quality experience. Certainly, a clean website is a demand of almost every client and it should be. 

In this blog post, you will learn why we need to implement git pre-commit hook? how it works? Simultaneously, we will also attempt to implement working examples in order to have better understanding.

Why we need to implement git pre-commit hook

Any website going live should pass certain standards and checks. If the web is built on any framework, then these checks are mandatory. How to ensure all developers are committing clean code? One way is to do code review,…

Join us for Tour de Drupal Vienna

Cycling is a great way to travel, experience new things and meet like-minded people. Join us for Tour de Drupal Vienna and let’s cycle together to DrupalCon!

Josef Dabernig Wed, 08/16/2017 - 15:54

On Sunday, 24 September we plan to start at 8am from Krems and travel to Tulln. At 11am we’ll arrive in Tulln and meet at the Weshapers office for some drinks & BBQ.

In the afternoon at 2pm, we plan to leave Tulln and cycle the remaining 40 km to Vienna to finally arrive in Vienna.

To sum-up, the meeting points are:

Source

The arrival is planned for Sunday, 24 September at 5pm in front of the big wheel in Vienna at Kaiserwiese.

How to get there?

There are many cycling routes that lead to Vienna. We created a map that currently highlights roads from east and west along the Danube. Also, check out the EuroVelo routes, bessone summarized the interesting ones for Vienna.

If you just wanna join for the last day, it’s a 30-minute train ride from Vienna to Tulln or 1:10 from Vienna to Krems and you can bring your bike on the train. Check ÖBB to book your train ticket.

Convinced? Tell us you are coming!

We've got a new installment in the decoupled Drupal project we're working on with Elevated Third and Hoorooh.

The project we're documenting was one we worked on for Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America.

The first installment in the series was A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Last week, a client asked me to investigate the state of the Elasticsearch support in Drupal 8. They're using a decoupled architecture and wanted to know how—using only core and contrib modules—Drupal data could be exposed to Elasticsearch. Elasticsearch would then index that data and make it available to the site's presentation layer via the Elasticsearch  Search API

During my research, I was impressed by the results. Thanks to Typed Data API plus a couple of contributed modules, an administrator can browse the structure of the content in Drupal and select what and how it should be indexed by Elasticsearch. All of this can be done using Drupal's admin interface.

In this article, we will take a vanilla Drupal 8 installation and configure it so that Elasticsearch receives any content changes. Let’s get started!

Downloading and starting Elasticsearch

We will begin by downloading and starting Elasticsearch 5, which is the latest stable release. Open https://www.elastic.co/downloads/elasticsearch and follow the installation instructions. Once you start the process, open your browser and enter http://127.0.0.1:9200. You should see something like the following screenshot:

undefined

Now let’s setup our Drupal site so it can talk to Elasticsearch.

Setting up Search API

High five to Thomas Seidl for the Search API module and Nikolay Ignatov for the Elasticsearch Connector module. Thanks to them, pushing content to Elasticsearch is a matter of a few clicks.

At the time of this writing there is no available release for Elasticsearch Connector, so you will have to clone the repository and checkout the 8.x-5.x branch and follow the installation instructions. As for Search API, just download and install the latest stable version.

Connecting Drupal to Elasticsearch

Next, let’s connect Drupal to the Elasticsearch server that we configured in the previous section. Navigate to Configuration > Search and Metadata > Elasticsearch Connector and then fill out the form to add a cluster:

undefined

Click 'Save' and check that the connection to the server was successful:

undefined

That’s it for Elasticsearch Connector. The rest of the configuration will be done using the Search API module.

Configuring a search index

Search API provides an abstraction layer that allows Drupal to push content changes to different servers, whether that's Elasticsearch, Apache Solr, or any other provider that has a Search API compatible module. Within each server, search API can create indexes, which are like buckets where you can push data that can be searched in different ways. Here is a drawing to illustrate the setup:

undefined

Now navigate to Configuration > Search and Metadata > Search API and click on Add server:

undefined

Fill out the form to let Search API manage the Elasticsearch server:

undefined

Click Save, then check that the connection was successful:

undefined

Next, we will create an index in the Elasticsearch server where we will specify that we want to push all of the content in Drupal. Go back to Configuration > Search and Metadata > Search API and click on Add index:

undefined

Fill out the form to create an index where content will be pushed by Drupal:

undefined undefined undefined

Click Save and verify that the index creation was successful:

undefined

Verify the index creation at the Elasticsearch server by opening http://127.0.0.1:9200/_cat/indices?v in a new browser tab:

undefined

That’s it! We will now test whether Drupal can properly update Elasticsearch when the index should reflect content changes.

Indexing content

Create a node and then run cron. Verify that the node has been pushed to Elasticsearch by opening the URL http://127.0.0.1:9200/elasticsearch_index_draco_elastic_index/_search, where elasticsearch_index_draco_elastic_index is obtained from the above screenshot:

undefined

Success! The node has been pushed but only it’s identifier is there. We need to select which fields we do want to push to Elasticsearch via the Search API interface at Configuration > Search and Metadata > Search API > Our Elasticsearch index > Fields:

undefined

Click on Add fields and select the fields that you want to push to Elasticsearch:

undefined

Add the fields and click Save. This time we will use Drush to reset the index and index the content again:

undefined

After reloading http://127.0.0.1:9200/elasticsearch_index_draco_elastic_index/_search, we can see the added(s) field(s):

undefined Processing the data prior to indexing it

This is the extra ball: Search API provides a list of processors that will alter the data to be indexed to Elasticsearch. Things like transliteration, filtering out unpublished content, or case insensitive searching, are available via the web interface. Here is the list, which you can find by clicking Processors when you are viewing the server at Search API :

undefined When you need more, extend from the APIs

Now that you have an Elasticsearch engine, it’s time to start hooking it up with your front-end applications. We have seen that the web interface of the Search API module saves a ton of development time, but if you ever need to go the extra mile, there are hooks, events, and plugins that you can use in order to fit your requirements. A good place to start is the Search API’s project homepage. Happy searching!

Acknowledgements

Thanks to:

Examples for Developer #11 Week of Coding Abhishek Lal B Wed, 08/16/2017 - 20:51

As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

Today, there is a Moderately Critical security release for the Views module to fix an Access Bypass vulnerability.

The Views module enables you to create custom displays of Drupal data.

When creating a View, you have the option to enable the use of AJAX. The Views module does not restrict access to the AJAX endpoint to only Views configured to use AJAX. This is mitigated by having access restrictions on the view.

See the security advisory for Drupal 7 for more information.

Here you can download the Drupal 6 patch for 6.x-2.x or 6.x-3.x.

If you have a Drupal 6 site using the Views module, we recommend you update immediately.

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

From time to time, we check Drupical. It's a website, where »you can Find Drupal events with ease!« With the help of it, we already presented you Drupal Camps, Virtual Drupal Camps, DrupalCons, Mini Drupal Camps and Global Drupal Sprint week. One of the nearest events is Drupal Introduction Workshop, listed on Trainings, so we’ll take a look at Drupal Trainings. More specifically, Global Drupal Training Days. To be completely fair, we presented Global Drupal Sprint Week a little late last time. We will not be making the same »mistake« again, so we'll look at the Drupal Global Training Days… READ MORE

Decoupled—or “headless”—content management systems have been trending in the last few years. This web development strategy, in its most basic form, is a “write once, publish anywhere” technology that separates the content from the presentation layer. Well, um...what the heck does that mean? It means that you can publish a piece of content and then use different systems to display that blog post on a computer, a mobile device, a voice-based system like Amazon’s Alexa, or even a smart watch. Basically, it allows developers to write to many different platforms without having to tediously recreate the wheel each time. (I think…)

It is a hot topic in the Drupal community. In fact, Acquia is holding Decoupled Developer Days this weekend (August 19-20 in NYC). Much of the conversation... Read the full article: Headless Drupal and SEO: What Marketers Need to Know

Everyone knows that process is important, but we have all gotten lost in the rush of daily tasks.

In our latest webinar, Project Management expert Rob McBryde and Vice President of Client Services James Rutherford shared how building and following a process for estimating web projects has driven success for their clients.

GSoC’17 Coding period | Week #11 | Uc wishlist chiranjeeb2410 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 15:01

In this post I will show you a technique to fix HTML issues, import images or perform content operations during migrations.

We have to fix source content before most content migrations. This can be challenging if there are many entries in the source database. The powerful Drupal 8 Migration API provides elegant ways to solve this type of problem.

To solve HTML issues, I always create my own process plugin. Here is an example how you would call your own process plugin to fix HTML issues in the body field:

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