Drupal Feeds

Prominent Midwest Business School brandt Tue, 01/10/2017 - 13:35 Visibility of Research and Ideas Through a Beautiful Design

A highly customizable layout to showcase our client's content.

Highlights
  • Highly customizable layout
  • A strong visual hierarchy punctuated with thoughtful typographic details  
  • Robust tagging and taxonomy for showcasing content

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat.

One of the oldest business schools in the country with a worldwide network of over 50,000 alumni, our client is one of the top-ranked business schools in the world. With a reputation for new ideas and research, it needs its online presence to reflect its bold, innovative approach to business education.

Our client’s approach to learning is to, “constantly question, test ideas, and seek proof,” which leads to new ideas and innovative solutions within business. Beyond the classroom, this approach empowers thought leaders and analytical minds to shape the future through deeper analysis and discovery.

In order to create greater visibility of the school’s research and ideas, the school publishes digital and print publications that give insight to business leaders and policymakers who can act upon those ideas. The publications help convey the concepts and research findings generated by the school, as well as by academics outside the school, via articles, infographics, charts, videos, and other devices.

Since both publications were due for an upgrade, our client decided to update its web presence and quarterly print magazine at the same time. With our client having already partnered with another firm to complete the magazine design, Palantir was brought in to design and develop the website in a way that provided cohesion between the two mediums.

Goals and Direction

Because the publication’s previous site was outdated and not optimized for mobile devices, the overall performance was less than ideal, with long loading times causing problems on tablets and smartphones. Additionally, the hierarchy on the old site needed some rethinking: the site was difficult to navigate, with limitations on how articles and videos could be connected, since visitors couldn’t easily or effectively filter or search the contents of the site.

The primary high-level goals for the redesign were to:

  • Move the site to Drupal, which allowed for increased community support and more flexibility in tools that could be incorporated
  • Provide an experience that demonstrated the depth of content from the publication
  • Optimize content search and social visibility
  • Provide a flexible platform that would evolve as the content evolved
  • Highlight visuals and alternative story formats
  • Leverage content featuring the business school’s high-profile faculty

To accomplish the majority of these goals, a well-planned content strategy was required. The new site needed the ability to display content in a variety of ways in order to make it digestible and actionable for readers. All content had to be easily sharable and optimized for the greatest possibility of distribution. Lastly once readers found content they wanted, related content should surface as well.

To support the content strategy, site editors needed the power to elevate content connections and relations through a strong visual design that offered flexibility, and with hierarchy that made sure news matched what visitors were looking for. They also required options on how to best showcase content, as well as the ability to include multiple storytelling mechanisms.

Examples of how related content is displayed in both desktop and mobile views while preserving typographic details.Site Focus

Once goals were outlined, Palantir worked to create a solid content strategy for the site. Taxonomy and tagging were addressed, and a new information architecture was put in place in order to make sure content was being seen and surfaced at the right time. After the initial strategy work was completed, it was decided to focus the work in two key areas:

  • Increase the number of pages during each visit. Prior to the redesign, a large percentage of visitors were coming in from search and social for a single article and then leaving before accessing any more articles, videos, or graphics. The former content management system made tying in related content difficult, so attention was given to each step of the process to make sure that related content could be easily surfaced by editors or by the system based on tagging. A goal was to give visitors more of the type of content they were looking for.
  • Improve number of visits per month. As important as it is to make navigating the site better, ensuring that visitors could find the content more easily was a key improvement that was needed for the site. As part of that, the site required better metadata for search and social optimization.
Style tile: Playful/Colorful/ProgressiveStyle tile: Dynamic/Modern/Bright

The design of the site was critical to achieving the goals, and we were given latitude to push the boundaries of the existing brand standards in order to give the magazine a distinctive look through color and typography. Our design team expanded the existing brand signals from our client in order to create style tiles to represent the general mood, typography, and colors recommended for the new site. With the variations in image treatment, typography, color palette, and button/quote designs, each style tile worked to capture a specific voice and personality for the magazine. This allowed us to quickly gauge how our client wanted to present itself to the world prior to starting formal layouts.

Once the final direction was chosen, we concentrated next on wireframing the pages so we could marry the functionality with the intended hierarchy and ensure that the revised content strategy was working as efficiently and powerfully as possible. Given that users spent the majority of time on those pages, individual article pages were given particular emphasis in wireframing, to ensure users would be enticed to explore further into the site.

In the layout phase, typography was given special attention, with drop-caps and call-out quotes being implemented to keep a print feel and break up a sea of gray text for long articles. This approach was particularly necessary on the mobile view, allowing the content to take center stage without losing any of the design details. Sharing on social media was also accounted for, with shorter quotes having their own dedicated sharing buttons. Additionally, the wealth of artwork provided by the school’s internal team created exciting opportunities for our design team on all applicable articles.

While not always the entry point for users, the homepage design needed to be as flexible as possible. Not only did we have to account for the hierarchy of stories and surface related content in the right way, but to allow for multiple types of content to be displayed while balancing related articles and email newsletter sign-up forms.

Examples of how the homepage can be customized to promote specific sections of content.  The Results

In the end, our client received a beautiful design that showcases the content well, and provides easy access to related content. Back-end editors are happy with the improved formatting and editing ability, with one editor saying, “it’s not even comparable to our previous site.” Our designs introduced new ways of visually displaying a wealth of content and helped push innovation for the magazine redesign. The print designers were able to apply our design signals to the associated print piece, creating a strong cohesion across all collateral to enhance the school’s brand.

The variety offered by the new homepage design supported the goal of increasing the page views, providing more opportunities to entice people to continue their experience, with connections between different articles and videos. With much of the greater University on Drupal, the move to Drupal also allowed the staff increased support within the school community. The flexibility of the modular design and build allowed staff to control the process and to be able to leverage important research to audiences and policymakers for years to come.

Content collapsed into mobile views.

 

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat. Drupal Services strategy design development

In our modules we can include default configuration to ship content types, views, vocabularies on install. If we try to reinstall the module, we'll get an error. Let's take a look at why and how we can solve it.

Unable to install … already exist in active configuration

During uninstall the configuration is not removed because it has no connection to the module itself and thus we get the error because Drupal modules may not replace active configuration. The reason for that is to prevent configuration losses.

We can move all the configuration to config/optional rather than config/install which basically means that configuration that does not exists will be installed and the existing one will be ignored. If we do this we can reinstall the module.

So, if we want the configuration to remain active we've already solved the problem, but if we don't want that, we want the module to remove all configuration and contents its provided we'll need to look at another solution.

Let's take a look at the Article content type that is created when using the Standard distribution on installing Drupal.

node.type.article.yml

langcode: en status: true dependencies: { } name: Article type: article description: 'Use <em>articles</em> for time-sensitive content like news, press releases or blog posts.' help: '' new_revision: true preview_mode: 1 display_submitted: true

field.field.node.article.body.yml

langcode: en status: true dependencies: config: - field.storage.node.body - node.type.article module: - text id: node.article.body field_name: body entity_type: node bundle: article label: Body description: '' required: false translatable: true default_value: { } default_value_callback: '' settings: display_summary: true field_type: text_with_summary

If we delete the content type, we can find out that the field instance body on the content type has been removed. First we actually see that the configuration will be removed when confirming the deletion of the content type, but also by looking in the database in the config table where active configuration is stored. It's gone.

The reason it's deleted is because it has an dependency on the node.type.article.yml configuration as we can see:

dependencies: config: - field.storage.node.body - node.type.article module: - text

So what we need to do to make sure the content type we create when installing or module, that it's configuration uses our module as an dependency. So let's take a look at how we can do that:

Let's imagine we have a custom_event module that creates a event content type.

node.type.event.yml

langcode: en status: true dependencies: enforced: module: - custom_event third_party_settings: {} name: Event type: event description: 'Event' help: '' new_revision: true preview_mode: 1 display_submitted: false

The dependencies-part is the interesting one:

dependencies: enforced: module: - custom_event

We have defined a custom_event module, in that module we have some exported configuration files in the config/install folder. We update the node.type.event.yml configuration file to have our module as an dependency. Now when we uninstall the module, the content type will be removed.

We also have to do this for our views, taxonomy, and field storages, or pretty much any configuration entity we provide configuration for. We don't have to worry about field instances, as we saw above those are dependent on the content type itself, but field storages on the other hand does not depend on a content type because you can reuse fields on multiple of those.

So, just add the module as an dependency and you're good to go, here's an example on a field storage field_image

field.storage.node.field_image.yml

langcode: en status: true dependencies: enforced: module: - custom_event module: - file - image - node id: node.field_image field_name: field_image entity_type: node type: image settings: uri_scheme: public default_image: uuid: null alt: '' title: '' width: null height: null target_type: file display_field: false display_default: false module: image locked: false cardinality: 1 translatable: true indexes: target_id: - target_id persist_with_no_fields: false custom_storage: false

Once upon a time, before I became a web developer, I worked doing sound and light for events. Like web development, the hours tend to be long, and the work tends to attract anti-social oddballs. Unlike web development, you deal with rock stars. Like most professions, it’s full of jargon and in-jokes. One of the phrases in common usage in that industry was “close enough for rock and roll”. Depending on who you were talking to, it might have been jazz rather than rock and roll, but you get the idea. It isn’t too far away from the notion previously popularised by Voltaire: “Perfect is the enemy of good”.

Another formulation of the same idea was expressed slightly more succinctly (and less politely) on the T-shirt shown in the photo attached to this blog post. It was designed by and for my old student union stage crew. While the T-shirt encapsulates a lot of the attitude of the team, it would be a mistake to imagine that we were sloppy. As I’ve written before, we were unpaid, but we certainly weren’t amateurs. That volunteer crew probably had as high a level of professionalism as any team I’ve been a part of. The point was that we cared about the right things, and there comes a point where you have to accept that things are as good as they are realistically going to get.

There’s a point where it just isn’t worth putting in more effort before launch. You’ve done as much as you can, and you’re proving the law of diminishing returns, or the Pareto principle. Besides, if you carry on fixing things, you’ll end up delaying your launch. If you’re getting ready to put on a show, there's a point where you have to open the doors, whether or not things are 100% ready. There are people outside who have bought tickets. They don’t want to wait while you mess about with your final preparations. They’re here to see the show, and their idea of perfection is very likely to be different from yours.

In events, these people are (somewhat dismissively) called ‘punters’, and they don’t notice the same things that you do. Unless they’re in the business themselves, their perception of the event is likely to be very different to yours. Working on stage crew, I’ve cobbled things together with gaffa tape and crossed my fingers, and the show has turned out fantastically well. As a musician, I’ve done shows that I thought were riddled with mistakes, and people in the audience told me it was the best gig they’d seen us play. Punters don’t go to gigs for technically competent sound or lighting, or flawless performances - they go because they want to have a good time. Things are never as shiny backstage as they are front of house.

Similarly, as a developer, I’ve built sites that have won awards, although the code made me cringe. From a technical point of view, you may not be proud of the code or the architecture underlying a website, but that’s not what people are here for. They are visiting your website for the content, or some of the interactivity that it provides. Most sites are not perfect, but they don’t need to be.

There are certain areas where you should never cut corners. In events, that’s things like rigging lights from the ceiling - you have to make sure that they won’t fall on anyone’s head. In development, it’s in security - you have to make sure that people’s data is safe. If there’s a chance people might get hurt, there’s no excuse for sloppiness. But in most areas of most projects, you’re never going to get things perfect - you need to know what’s good enough.

I’ve been working on my own current side project (the redesign and Drupal 8 upgrade of an art gallery listings site) for a while now, in between the day job and family life. Just before Christmas, I still had quite a few tasks left on my board, but having read an article by Ben Roux, I knew that I needed to get the thing live, sooner rather than later. This is the great thing about side projects - there's something marvellously liberating being able to just make that decision for myself, without consultation with clients or stakeholders.

The great thing about putting your work out there on the web is that publishing improvements is trivial. I’ve defined my minimum viable redesign, so I can iterate and improve after launch, even though some of the functionality from the old Drupal 6 version isn’t ready. I could keep polishing and polishing, but it’s better to put it out there, and fix things later. Besides, I’m pretty confident that the new design is better than the old one, in spite of a few rough edges. Chances are, I’m the only person who will pick up on most of the problems with the site.

On the other hand, this means that nothing is ever finished. One of the things I loved about working in events was that there was a clear beginning, middle and end. We would start with an empty room and a full truck. We would unpack the truck, and fill the room with gear. Then we would put on a show. After the show, we’d pack up the gear and put it back into the truck. Then the truck would drive to the next venue, and we could (usually) go home with the satisfaction of a job well done.

With web development, it’s more like endlessly pushing a boulder up a hill. After putting a site live, there’s no great moment of triumph. If we take the analogy of a concert, it’s more like opening the doors and letting the punters in. Unless it’s a short-lived marketing site, the only time you ever take a website down and pack everything away is if the business has failed. There are always things to improve. I could keep adding features, or tweaking the design, or improving performance forever. But what value would it add? Besides, it’s a side project, and I’ve got other things to do.

Tags:  The Gallery Guide Drupal Drupal 8 work All tags
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Trash (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 01/10/2017 - 21:04 Episode 13

Here is where we bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll investigate Trash, a module where deleted content entities are sent to a bin where they can later be reenabled or permanently removed.

Granite Construction Drupal Case Study antonella Wed, 01/11/2017 - 03:00

Previously we talked about the different ways in which you can contribute to Drupal, setting up your project, configuring git and connecting and checking that you are connected to your sandbox project. 

Now we are going to upload our project and check the project meets Drupal's standards.

We’re taking it up a couple notches this year down in Orlando for the 9th Florida DrupalCamp! We're expanding in every dimension we can find - highlighted by an opening day (Friday) of full-day workshops followed by two days (Saturday and half-day Sunday) of sessions!

Amazing Trainings

In previous years, we’ve had concurrent trainings on Saturdays and some sprinting on Sunday. This year, we changed it up: Friday will be a full training day including workshops on:

  • Beginning React JS - taught by John Tucker
  • Docker for Development with Drupal - taught by Lisa Ridley  
  • Introduction to Drupal 8 - taught by DrupalEasy's own Michael Anello  
  • Introduction to Drupal 8 Theming - taught by Suzanne Dergacheva
  • Introduction to DrupalVM - taught by Ben Hosmer

The best part is that trainings are included with the price of the ticket (now $35). You sign up for the training when registering. Space is limited, however, so register soon!

Three Phenomenal Featured Speakers

We have three amazing featured speakers this year!

Many More Extraordinary Sessions and Speakers

We have over 30 sessions already submitted with several weeks to go until the deadline. We still need more. Check them out and submit your session soon.

Kick-A** Weather

Orlando in February. Sunny and warm :)

The Absolute Best Sponsors Ever

It's true, we have the best group of sponsors money can't buy! We're crazy-happy about having Achieve Agency as our top-level Platinum sponsor. This newly formed South Florida shop is looking to make a big splash in the community, and we're happy that we can help introduce them to everyone. 

Combined with Johnson & Johnson, devPanel, and Digital Echidna as Gold-level sponsors as well as all of our other amazing supporters (including DrupalEasy!), we're excited to bring you the biggest and best Drupal event you've ever seen (not to mention a few fun surprises!)

Lots More Sensational Stuff!

From a new logo, great catering, t-shirt, giveaways, and even an integrated video game easter-egg on our website, there’s lots to be had. Don't miss it!  Register today or regret it for the rest of 2017!

And it is finally 2017! New year, new projects, new challenges and, of course, a lot of Drupal events.

On this short post, I'll go through a few Drupal events in North America that we'll be either attending or be sponsoring on the first quarter of the year.

If you are planning to attend, feel free to get in touch with us in advance. We love hanging around and meeting with fellow community members, potential business partners, and people just interested in getting to know us.

read more

Yesterday I presented Drupal VM Tips & Tricks at the DrupalDC meetup, remotely. I didn't have a lot of time to prepare anything for the presentation, but I thought it would be valuable to walk through some of the neat features of Drupal VM people might not know about.

Here's the video from the presentation:

*/

Some relevant links mentioned during the presentation:

New Years Resolution: Spend More Time With Family and Friends brandt Wed, 01/11/2017 - 16:11 Allison Manley Jan 11, 2017

In this five-part series, every Monday in January we’ll explore a New Year’s resolution and how it can apply to your web project.

Stay connected with the latest news on web strategy, design, and development.

Sign up for our newsletter.

Surrounding oneself with a community of friends and family that offer needed support is important to us all. Palantir spent twenty years building our own culture and community right here at the office! But we’ve also been active members in the Drupal community for 12 years:

  • We’ve made contributions to every facet of the Drupal project: Core development, contributed modules, themes, financial assistance, training, documentation, conference organizing, and one Palantiri is a member of the Drupal Board.
  • This means we have a long history of helping organizations level up so they can become Drupal contributors and participants as well.
  • The collaboration in the open source community is one of the reasons Palantiri love Drupal so much.
Upcoming Events

Are you looking to get involved in the Drupal community? Some ideas:

Besides the Drupal and Open Source communities, Palantir works in some specific verticals that have their own rich and robust communities. We’re still finalizing exactly where we’ll be in 2017, but we know for sure you’ll find us at the following conferences so we can connect with friends in those industries and offer them support as needed:

Next week’s resolution: get organized. 

We'd love to help you keep your 2017 resolution.

Let's chat.
Exporting and importing big Drupal databases

Once your site's database dump file gets to be 1GB or more, phrases like "oh, just download and import a DB dump" can't really be taken for granted anymore. So here are some tips for dealing with large databases, especially those of the Drupal variety.

Exporting

Before we can import, we must export. With a big DB, you don't want to just do a regular old mysqldump > outfile.sql and call it a day. Here are some tips.

Find the size before exporting

It can sometimes be useful to see how big the export is going to be before you actually export anything. That way, you can know ahead of time if you need to be doing this or that to reduce the size, or if it won't matter since the whole thing won't be that big anyway.

Here's a query you can run to see the size per DB table:

SELECT TABLE_SCHEMA, TABLE_NAME, DATA_LENGTH / POWER(1024,1) Data_KB, DATA_LENGTH / POWER(1024,2) Data_MB, DATA_LENGTH / POWER(1024,3) Data_GB FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema NOT IN   ('information_schema','performance_schema','mysql') ORDER BY DATA_LENGTH;

And here's another query you can run to see what the total size for the entire DB is: 

SELECT Data_BB / POWER(1024,1) Data_KB, Data_BB / POWER(1024,2) Data_MB, Data_BB / POWER(1024,3) Data_GB FROM (SELECT SUM(data_length)   Data_BB FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema NOT IN   ('information_schema','performance_schema','mysql')); Dump without unnecessary data

For those cases where you need the database structure for all of the tables, but you don't need the data for all of them, here's a technique you can use. This will grab the entire DB structure, but lets you exclude data for any tables that you want. For example, search_index, cache_*, or sessions tables will be good places to cut out some fat.

# First we export the table structure. mysqldump --no-data database_name > /export.sql # Grab table data, excluding tables we don't need. mysqldump --no-create-info   --ignore-table=database_name.table_name1   --ignore-table=database_name.table_name2   database_name >> export.sql

Just replace "table_name1" and "table_name2" with the tables that you want to skip, and you're golden. Also note that you can use the % character as a wildcard, so for example, you could ignore "cache%" for all cache tables.

After you do that, you'll have a single export.sql file that contains the DB structure for all tables and the DB data for all tables except the ones you excluded. Then, you'll probably want to compress it...

Compress all the things

This one may go without saying, but if you're not compressing your database dumps then either they're really tiny, or you're dumber than a dummy. 

drush sql-dump --gzip --result-file=db.sql

Compare that with the regular old:

drush sql-dump --result-file=db.sql

...and you're going to see a huge difference.

Or if you already have the SQL dump that you need to compress, you can compress the file directly using:

gzip -v db.sql

That will output a db.sql.gz file for you.

Importing

Now you have a nice clean compressed DB dump with everything you need and nothing you don't, and you're ready to import. Here are a few ways to ease the pain.

Import a compressed dump directly

Instead of having to decompress the dump before importing, you can do it inline:

gunzip -c db.sql.gz | drush sqlc Exclude data when importing

If you receive a DB dump that has a lot of data you don't need (caches, sessions, search index, etc.), then you can just ignore that stuff when importing it as well. Here's a little one-liner for this:

gunzip -c db.sql.gz | grep -Ev "^INSERT INTO \`(cache_|search_index|sessions)" | drush sqlc

What this is doing is using "grep" as a middleman and saying "skip any lines that are insertion lines for these specific tables we don't care about". You can edit what's in the parenthesis to add/remove tables as needed.

Monitor import progress

There's nothing worse than just sitting and waiting and having no idea how far along the import has made it. Monitoring progress makes a long import seem faster, because there's no wondering. 

If you have the ability to install it (from Homebrew or apt-get or whatever), the "pv" (Pipe Viewer) command is great here:

pv db.sql | drush sqlc

Or if your database is compressed:

pv db.sql.gz | gunzip | drush sqlc

Using "pv" will show you a progress bar and a completion percentage. It's pretty awesome.

If you don't have "pv" then you can settle for the poor man's version:

watch "mysql database_name -Be 'SHOW TABLES' | tail -n2"

That slick little guy will show you the table that is currently importing, and auto-updates as it runs, so you can at least see how far through the table list it has gone.

Tools and Resource

In this post I tried to focus on commands that everyone already has. If this just isn't cutting it for you, then look into these tools which could help even more:

  • SyncDB - a couple Drush commands that split DB dumps into separate files and import them in parallel, drastically speeding things up
  • Drush SQL Sync Pipe - an alternative to "drush sql-sync" that uses pipes where possible to speed things up
mcrittenden Wed, 01/11/2017 - 23:15
The purpose of a great content is first to be explored and then to be read. Therefore, being listed on a first page on search engines is a key thing. Shortly, you will be able to read how to Search Engine Optimize your Drupal 8 website. But before Drupal SEO Book is released – you can pre-order it here or wait until 15th January – we will look at the best books Drupal 8 has to offer. The first choice is Drupal 8 Development Cookbook by Matt Glaman, which enjoys the best feedback from readers. The book is appropriate for web developers and site builders. It contains the whole chapter for… READ MORE

It’s now over a year since the release of Drupal 8, the first new version of the open source content management framework in five years. It represented a significant rethinking of the platform when it launched in November 2015 and 2017 is likely to be another significant year for Drupal 8 with further updates and developments expected. As Dries Buytaert, the founder and lead developer of Drupal outlined in a blog last September:

“The only way to stay competitive is to have the best product and to help people adopt it more seamlessly. This means that we have to continue to be able to reinvent ourselves and that we need to make the resulting changes less scary and easier to absorb. We decided that we wanted more frequent releases of Drupal, with new features, API additions, and an easy upgrade path.”

One of the most common questions we get asked is, “How is Drupal 8 doing and what can we expect in the future?". Understandably, this is important to many organisations currently using previous versions and the Drupal community that has a stake in its success. But it’s also important to new users looking to migrate over.

There’s a significant amount of interest because, as with any new update, organisations have to decide whether the framework is right for them. While Drupal 8 is still maturing, adoption rates are now growing fast. This year we migrated the Ixis website to Drupal 8, which you can read more about our experience here.

User growth and high profile successes

2016 saw progress in a variety of key areas including user growth, as well as a number of high-profile successes and this is likely to continue in 2017. As with all new updates, it has taken some time for Drupal 8 to gain traction in terms of the number of users but there has been a clear upward trajectory over the course of the year. There are currently 120,000 Drupal 8 projects, and while Drupal 7 is currently running more than 1 million, this still represents significant growth one year in, especially with adoption rates starting to increase, as outlined on drupal.org.

The wide range of prominent Drupal 8 projects that have launched in the past year have helped to showcase the power of the new platform. These include:

  • NBA.com - Millions of fans around the globe rely on the NBA's Drupal 8 website to livestream games, read stats and standings, and stay up to date on their favourite team.

  • Nasdaq - Drupal 8 is used as the basis for its next generation Investor Relations Website Platform. IR websites are where public companies share their most sensitive and critical news and information with their shareholders, institutional investors, the media and analysts.
The migration question

Although the Drupal 7 user base remains solid and the platform will be supported for a long time, there is an end-of-life in sight for it. This is expected to be in two to three years time but might be even sooner, with some sources predicting an end to Drupal 7 development as soon as October 2017. Either way, Drupal 8 promising a host of further improvements, with Drupal 8.2 already available, many organisations are beginning to look at early migration. The good thing about Drupal 8 is that it comes bundled with a suite of tools to assist with the migration of your content from previous versions, making the task less daunting than it might initially seem. With its ‘continuous innovation’ mission statement a migration to Drupal 8 in 2017 will provide the best possible access to the latest functionality and improvements, helping to unlock the framework’s true potential.

For more information about Drupal 8 contact us on hello@ixis.co.uk or call 01925 320 041.

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2017 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it.

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2017. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the submissions. Members of this committee and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

*  2015: Cathy Theys  
*  2016: Gábor Hojtsy  

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award please nominate them at https://www.drupal.org/aaron-winborn-award

Within weeks of introducing the contribution credit system on Drupal.org we realized we had created something powerful. Like all open source projects, Drupal has a behind-the-scenes economy of contribution in which individuals, organizations, and end users work together to maintain the software as a public good. That behind-the-scenes economy was brought to the fore when we chose to rank the Drupal Marketplace by issue credits. For the first time, Drupal.org gave businesses a direct financial incentive to contribute code.  

Being good stewards of these incentives is a sobering responsibility, but also a great opportunity. We can use this system to recognize the selfless effort of our community volunteers, to reward the organizations that sponsor their employees' time to give back to the project, and to connect end-users with the organizations that are the biggest contributors.

But as we often say in this community—contribution is more than code. It is the time provided by dedicated volunteers; the talent of community organizers, documentation maintainers, and developers; and the treasure provided by organizations that sponsor Drupal events and fund the operations and infrastructure that maintain the project.

What are we changing?

We’re updating the ranking algorithm for Drupal.org’s Marketplace of service providers and list of all organizations in the Drupal ecosystem. We've expanded on the issue credit system to create a more generic contribution credit system which lets us recognize more types of contribution. Each type of contribution is now weighted to give the organization an overall amount of contribution credit. We've built this system so that we can continuously evolve the incentives it creates by adjusting the weight given to each type of contribution as the project's needs change. To prevent gaming, we will not be publishing the exact weights or total contribution score, but those weights have been reviewed by the Association Board and Community Working Group.

We've carefully chosen a few new types of contribution to factor into the ranking. These were selected because they create incentives to reach specific goals: encouraging organizations to sponsor development of Drupal, gathering more Drupal 8 success stories that can be used to promote Drupal adoption, and recognizing the financial contributions that promote the fiscal health of the Drupal association.

We now calculate the following 4 types of contribution into overall contribution credit:

What about other types of contribution?

Of course, these new factors still don't include all types of contribution. This iteration aims to add measurable factors that reward the behavior of organizations that are good Drupal citizens, and incentivize some of the most important contributions that have a big impact in moving the project forward. But there are other factors we'd like to include in the future! We're keeping track of these additional kinds of contribution, such as sponsoring local user groups, organizing training days, writing documentation, and more, in this issue: #2649100: Improve contribution statistics on user and organization profiles.

There are two factors in particular that we are not yet including that we'd like to address.

The first is project application reviews. These reviews are a critical part of the lifecycle of a new project on Drupal.org, but because we are making the Project Application Revamp a key priority for the first part of 2017, this was not our focus in this initial update. We may revisit this factor as the Project Application Revamp initiative gets underway.

The second is camp organization. We know that there are many individuals and organizations who invest heavily in Drupal Camps, and this has been a critical part of the project's success. However, at this time our data about the individuals and organizations who participate in camp organization is purely self-reported, and therefore too vulnerable to manipulation to include in the algorithm at this time. In the future we hope we can find a responsible way to measure and credit this kind of contribution.

We’ll continue to look for other good factors to add, and do our best to weigh them fairly.

How often will the algorithm change? Who governs these changes?

As this is our first major change to the marketplace ranking system since the launch of issue credits, we may need to make some small adjustments in the first weeks following the launch. However, we know that too frequent changes to the incentive structure will be frustrating for the individuals and organizations who are contributing to the project. Therefore, after the initial tuning we intend to update the marketplace ranking system on a roughly 6 month cycle.

While the primary responsibility to manage the contribution credit system is ours, we have committed to vetting these and future changes with members of the Drupal Association Board and Community Working Group.

Yesterday I presented WebWash’s first webinar on Page Manager and Panels. I had lots of fun doing the presentation and was asked some pretty good questions at the end. In the video I cover the following: What’s new in Drupal 8. Demonstrate how to create a custom page. Show you how to use multiple variants. Demonstrate Panels IPE (in-place editor). Finally, I show you how to use Bootstrap Layouts.
Start:  2017-01-17 12:00 - 2017-01-19 12:00 UTC Organizers:  stefan.r David_Rothstein Fabianx catch xjm cilefen Event type:  Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting)

The monthly security release window for Drupal 8 and 7 core will take place on Wednesday, January 18.

This does not mean that a Drupal core security release will necessarily take place on that date for any of the Drupal 8 or 7 branches, only that you should watch for one (and be ready to update your Drupal sites in the event that the Drupal security team decides to make a release).

There will be no bug fix or feature release on this date. The next window for a Drupal core patch (bug fix) release for all branches is Wednesday, February 01. The next scheduled minor (feature) release for Drupal 8 will be on Wednesday, April 5.

Drupal 6 is end-of-life and will not receive further security releases.

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

Direct .mp3 file download.

David Thompson (dbt102), consultant with Function 1, and maintainer of the BACnet and AppCtrl modules (used for building energy management) joins Mike on this first podcast of 2017.

Interview DrupalEasy News Three Stories Sponsors Picks of the Week Upcoming Events Follow us on Twitter Five Questions (answers only)
  1. Bikram Yoga
  2. BACnet advanced workstation with Web Control
  3. Presenting at DrupalCon
  4. Emu
  5. Understanding the value of CCK
Intro Music Subscribe

Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play or Miro. Listen to our podcast on Stitcher.

If you'd like to leave us a voicemail, call 321-396-2340. Please keep in mind that we might play your voicemail during one of our future podcasts. Feel free to call in with suggestions, rants, questions, or corrections. If you'd rather just send us an email, please use our contact page.

Drupal 8.3 is still a few months away, coming April 5, 2017, but there are already some changes we can look at, most notably in the experimental modules. In December, 2 new experimental modules were added to core, and BigPipe was officially changed from a beta module to stable. The 2 new modules you'll find in 8.3 are Workflows and Layout. Let's take a peek at what these are all about.

Palantir.net's Guide to Digital Governance Palantir.net's Guide to Digital Governance brandt Fri, 01/13/2017 - 15:04 Scott DiPerna Jan 16, 2017

This comprehensive guide is intended to help get you started when developing a governance plan for your institution’s digital communications.

In this guide we will cover...
  • What digital governance is
  • Why digital governance is important
  • What topics you need to think about when building out a digital governance plan

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat.

 

Download the guide here.

Stay connected with the latest news on web strategy, design, and development.

Sign up for our newsletter.

Pages